Saturday, August 6, 2011

ANATOMY OF A QUILT
Part 5
I have been SO BUSY!  Between my 8-5 day job, chairing a show, doing a show, and shipping orders (hooray!), I haven't had a block of time to work on this quilt.  I walk past it sadly, wanting to proceed, knowing full well that it's not in the cards.  So all this week, I planned to spend Saturday with the quilt, and here we are!
I cut out a bunch of trees a few days ago - and I do mean a bunch.  They were big in the foreground tapering to really, really small in the mountain.  This did give the quilt a lot of depth.  It sat on my work table for days this way and the more I looked at it, the more I knew it wouldn't work.  The tiny slivers of material across the base of the mountain were far too small to appliqué... they'd disappear under the thread.  So, I thought, I'll just zig-zag those trees in.  But ultimately, I didn't like that idea any better because some of the trees would be fabric trunks and others would be zig-zag stitch trunks - where's the dividing line?
So this morning, I opted for less depth - still some, but not nearly as much.  Before I cut these tree trunks out, I ironed a glue backing on a section of material so that the entire tree trunk would be glued.  This made it possible to use a narrower appliqué and not have to worry about anything fraying.  I liked the way the trees will be more against the mountain, too.  With the depth-trees, the mountain was quite an extensive piece of the same color, which bothered me.  
So now that I was happy, I peeled all of the paper backing off the trees and ironed them in place.  My original plan was to appliqué the trees with brown thread.  But when it came time to do it, I noticed this deep sage thread in my rack.  Looking at both on the quilt, I preferred the sage.  Question...  do I have enough of it; answer...  I think so!
And I did!  This is always cause for celebration!!!  In this picture, the quilt has been ironed and sized.  Sewing machines were designed to sew in straight lines, and I do those only occasionally.  The trick with appliqué - and it's taken me perhaps years to get to this point - is not to twist the material through a curve.  You have to turn the fabric so it continues to lay flat.  This one laid virtually flat when I got done with the trees, so I'm finally getting the hang of this!

At this point, I spent the better part of an hour cleaning up my work room.  No more need of that pile of materials, so it got sorted, folded and put away.  Done with the Heat-n-Bond, so it and all the usable scraps got re-rolled, re-packed and put away, too.  Not going to be cutting anything else, so the cutting mat, ruler and rotary cutter got hung on their place on the wall.

With the quilt on my nice, clean work table, out comes the chalk!  I love using my chalk pencil on a quilt.  If I goof or I don't like it, you just brush it away and start again.  I drew in all of the centers of the palm fronds, stood back and nodded!  Out came the embroidery hoop, the correct needles, the greens I'll be using and the pinch scissors.  I'm sure you can guess what the next installment of this journal will be!

1 comment:

  1. You are one busy lady! The quilt is turning out just lovely! :)

    ReplyDelete